Entries by Dr. Gluck

The Best Toothpaste for Braces (Here’s How to Tell)

It’s not just about brushing your teeth. Brushing can help prevent cavities, but there are other things you should know too! Toothpaste is one way to defend against nasties like plaque and bacteria that grow on our tooth surfaces when we don’t brush thoroughly enough or apply an ineffective mouthwash after eating junk food that contains sugars. These sugary foods feed the growth of tartar. In this post, we’ll show you what toothpaste is best with braces. Let’s get going.

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What Kind of Toothpaste to Use With Braces
Plaque Destroyer
You should brush your teeth more often if you have braces. Toothpaste that contains ingredients like bicarbonate or potassium nitrate will help remove plaque, which can lead to tooth decay in this demographic group. 
You must be careful about the type they pick when choosing what flavor goes best for them since orthodontic bands constrain from swishing liquids around orally too much without spitting it out afterward so only use a tube every week unless otherwise directed by an expert dentist/dental hygienist.
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Fluoride Toothpaste with Braces
Toothpaste is a powerful tool for fighting tooth decay and cavities. The fluoride helps strengthen enamel, but there are still important steps that everyone should take before any of the benefits can happen on their own. 
When introducing this product to children under 12 years old they need three times per day, use just one pea size amount onto each brush after every meal or drink to have its full strength impact against plaque buildup around your teeth. 
A Whitening Toothpaste with Braces Warning
Toothpaste for whiter teeth is available in many different flavors. If you wear braces, however, these kinds of toothpaste won’t be able to reach all the tooth surfaces since they would bump against metal or ceramic pieces that are attached. 
This will stain them with different colors once the materials come off after being worn down by brushing with an ordinary brush.
Mouthwash Hygiene
Mouthwash is an essential part of dental care. Not only does it help remove surface stains to kill germs, but liquid forms like that found in many brands can access hard-to-clean places missed by toothbrush or floss while fluoride treatments can also improve oral hygiene habits for a more confident smile.
BRUSHING TIPS:
Hold the toothbrush at an angle with bristles facing up towards your nose (or brace brackets) and gently tease them between each bracket using small circular motions until you reach the bottom wire where it meets its counterpart. 
Next, this time let’s face down instead; apply pressure along both edges’ surfaces when brushing slowly upwards from front center to back right corner then left rear quarter.
Whether you’re a professional or just starting your dental hygiene practice, it’s important to brush your teeth twice per day. If we don’t use interdental brushes at night when there are fewer food particles on the surface and bacteria thrive better between braces due cleaning becomes even more difficult without using one.
A small device called an “inter-dental scraper” can help reduce plaque buildup by physically removing these stains before they have time enough alone to grow into full-size tartar formations. 
Modern devices work well too, a WaterPik machine will send water swishing around the mouth and a thorough clean will ensue.
Conclusion
The choice of toothpaste is important for those undergoing orthodontic treatment. Dr. Gluck and his team know how to guide you. 
Gluck Orthodontics is a trusted name in orthodontic care. Dr. Gluck is a board-certified orthodontic specialist (a distinction only one-quarter of all practicing orthodontists today can claim). He is also a Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics.
Here at Gluck Orthodontics, we proudly provide our patients with the very latest in orthodontic care plus a little something extra from the friendly staff that we like to call ‘The Gluck Experience.’
Schedule your initial orthodontic consultation, call us at 615-269-5903. Or visit us online or in person.

Keep reading this https://www.drgluck.com/best-toothpaste-for-braces/ on Nashville Orthodontist Articles.

This post was originally published on this site

Orthodontics and Diabetes (5 Facts)

Diabetes is a serious disease that affects millions of people in the United States. Although it may not be life-threatening, diabetes can cause other consequences such as tooth decay and orthodontic treatments to become ineffective if untreated or poorly controlled with medications like insulin. In this post, we’ll show you 5 facts on whether or not diabetes impacts braces – let’s get started.

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Diabetes and Oral Disease 
A lot more than just blood glucose levels affect oral health. The amount of sugar going into someone’s mouth also matters plenty too (diabetes won’t make any difference here.) But, there are two specific aspects related specifically to dental work: 

Plaque buildup due to bacteria feeding off food stuck between teeth
Receding gums 

Diabetes is on the rise in adults, and it’s important to take notice. This condition has been shown as being closely related to oral health issues like dental caries/cavities from consuming sugar during meals which can lead towards gum disease for people who have diabetes; two times more likely than average citizens.
As such, since they’re already at risk, make sure that you are practising good hygiene habits before treatment starts or after finishing their braces so there aren’t any problems later down the road.
You may develop gum disease or cavities if you don’t brush your teeth as often as you should.  Bacteria that are present inside the mouth after eating food lead them into plaque buildups on the surface of our teeth (especially those who have problems with their mouth cavity.) 
Diabetes also weakens white blood cells, and this makes us more susceptible to infections in general – not just oral ones. Saliva helps wash away bacteria and neutralize tooth-decaying acids; without it, we’re left vulnerable to potentially harmful effects such as gingivitis which can lead to periodontitis (gum inflammation.) This is an issue where some bone is lost around tooth surfaces leading towards tooth loss.
Not only does diabetes damage blood vessels, but the thickening of these narrow passages slows down nutrient delivery. This can affect your overall health in many ways from a lack of nutrients reaching some parts of your body like muscle tissue which may lead to weakness and fatigue over time – not good.
The most common type of gum disease is periodontal, and it can lead to serious complications like loosened or loss of teeth. It’s caused by buildup in our mouths from bacteria which causes infection when brushing isn’t enough to get rid of them all. 
This leads to inflammation with swelling and bleeding under the surface tissue around your gums where they attach near the bone (gingiva.) Possible symptoms include pain while eating food high in sugar such as juice drinks; toothaches at night time due to pressure on sore areas from sleeping positions.
Orthodontics & Diabetes
When you have periodontal disease, braces can stress your gums and interfere with orthodontic treatment. The constant movement of teeth could also cause complications down the line – like early termination for example.
To avoid these issues it is best to practice managing diabetes through healthy eating habits that are well-balanced every day as often recommended by doctors or other medical professionals who know more about insulin injections than an orthodontist. 
The Signs Of Pending Issues
It is important to contact your treatment provider as soon as you notice any signs or symptoms of gum disease so they can help protect your teeth. Some common warning flags include:

A difference in the position and pressure applied when chewing food  
Sensitivity from receding gums (you may hurt more easily) 
Swollen/ tender gums, redness on brushing flossing while using interdental cleaners; 
Bleeding if not wearing dental appliances correctly

Smoking and Gum Disease
If you combine diabetes and smoking, the chances of developing periodontitis are up 20 times more among those who do not quit. Fortunately for this high-risk group though it is possible to prevent gum disease by controlling blood sugar levels with diet or insulin injections as well as practising good oral hygiene practices like brushing twice per day after every meal using fluoride toothpaste/mouthwash.
Conclusion
Gluck Orthodontics is a trusted name in orthodontic care. Dr. Gluck is a board-certified orthodontic specialist (a distinction only one-quarter of all practising orthodontists today can claim). He is also a Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics.
Here at Gluck Orthodontics, we proudly provide our patients with the very latest in orthodontic care plus a little something extra from the friendly staff that we like to call ‘The Gluck Experience.’
To learn more about Diabetes and oral health, schedule your initial orthodontic consultation, call us at 615-269-5903. Or visit us online or in person.

Keep reading this https://www.drgluck.com/orthodontics-diabetes/ on Nashville Orthodontist Articles.

This post was originally published on this site