Entries by Jonathan Gluck

Best Toothbrush For Braces

We should always brush our teeth because it makes them cleaner. When you have braces you have to be extra careful about oral hygiene. Food particles and toothpaste getting stuck around brackets is a tough enemy. An Electric Toothbrush is a good way to combat nasties during orthodontic treatment. In this post, we’ll take you through the best toothbrush for braces. Let’s get looking.

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What’s all the Fuss About? 
The best electric toothbrushes can remove up to 2x more plaque than traditional ones. Not only are these rotating brushing heads able to reach places that regular brushes cannot, but they also have the added benefit of being gentler on your gums because you do not need as much pressure or force in order for them to work effectively.
Better Results
Electric toothbrushes can reach hard-to-get areas that an ordinary brush cannot. This is very useful for people who have braces, filled teeth or dental work because it allows them to clean their teeth more effectively and thoroughly than with a manual brush. 
Smart Toothbrush
In modern times you can get electric toothbrushes that connect to Apple phones and watches. They have app functions to help you keep track of oral health and cleaning. Trainers can guide you through a good clean. A useful app if you are wearing braces and need a bit of guidance. 
More Advancements 
These days, electric toothbrushes have become more advanced and offer various modes to customize your brushing experience. These include a whitening mode that is perfect for those who want a gentle but effective clean or sensitive mode designed with extra care of gums in mind.
Timer
It is recommended you brush for 2 minutes. That means 30 seconds per section. Top right and top left and so on. If this seems a good idea look for a toothbrush with a built-in timer. 
Different Types Electric Toothbrush
Rechargeable Toothbrushes
Rechargeable toothbrushes make it easy to take care of your oral hygiene without environmental concerns. The rechargeable option eliminates the need for batteries and offers more power than traditional models, so you get all of the plaque off with no additional effort required like some other types would require. 
Recharging usually requires a simple plug into an outlet that might have many high-tech options such as timers or pressure sensors built-in. These benefits may not come standard on traditional manual models but could offer their advantages too.
Battery Power
A battery-powered toothbrush is a great idea because it’s easy for anyone, with or without dexterity issues in their hands to brush from the comfort of home. Many models have replaceable heads so you can change them out when they wear down and are powered by AA or AAA batteries which make changing very simple.
To keep your pearly whites healthy, always use fluoride toothpaste and a soft round-bristled brush. These are great for preventing cavities. Brush your teeth at least three times each day with light pressure to ensure that you’re removing all of the cavity-causing bacteria on them. 
To make this task even easier try brushing in circular motions covering every inch of one side before repeating it on the other half so there’s no area left unchecked. Make sure you replace any old toothbrushes after 3 months if they aren’t frayed or bent.
This is because these can cause damage as well which might lead to more dental catastrophes down the road like gum disease and additional plaque build up inside those hard-to-reach crevices between our molars.
Conclusion
Ensuring good oral health during treatment is essential to good results. Having braces means you’ll need to set up and a good routine. 
Dr. Gluck and the professionals at Gluck Orthodontics will be the ones to help with your routine. We are completely independent. Our Doctors have years of experience in all types of treatments and sit on professional bodies and are embedded, orthodontic community members. With us, you’ll have one expert for the entire treatment plan. No exceptions. 
For you to get in touch with the team, you can schedule an appointment in their Tennessee office.

Keep reading this https://www.drgluck.com/best-toothbrush-for-braces/ on Nashville Orthodontist Articles.

This post was originally published on this site

Where Did My Orthodontist Go? (3 EASY FACTS)

Finding and keeping a good orthodontist is tough. There are things to look for when choosing an ortho. Some patients are forced to undergo treatment from changing experts. This is bad for the treatment time scale and quality. In this post, we’ll show you why finding an independent expert orthodontist is better for your treatment and therefore your smile. Let’s get going. Image by Here and now, unfortunately, ends my journey on Pixabay from Pixabay

The old days of one expert for treatment have been gone for 50 years. Why? Well, the answer is stark. Most orthodontists DO NOT own their practices. There are many reasons why. Let’s look deeper into that fact.

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New Orthodontists Work for Others First
After decades of rising demand for orthodontic care, corporate dentistry has soared into the market to capitalize on a recent influx in graduates. These companies set up shop and hire new doctors to provide care while they manage all business aspects from within their centralized office space.
This allows them to maximize revenue potential by maximizing patient acquisition costs at minimal cost maintaining profitable growth year after year.
Many aspiring orthodontists might find themselves kicking themselves later if they don’t take advantage of being able to have hands-on experience under an established practitioner before opening up shop independently again down the line when finances permit it.

hands-on experience under an established practitioner

Orthodontists can be found in almost every healthcare specialty from primary care doctors’ offices all the way through pediatric dentistry. However, most fall under one umbrella: general practice.
While this means that dental school graduates have their choice of working with someone else until enough money comes together so they can finally open their own office, it also provides them opportunities to work for orthodontic specialists like oral surgeons and periodontist specialists alike.

Common Problems With Corporate Offices
Orthodontists who work for corporations are often intelligent and trained professionals, but they may run into disadvantages when compared to those in self-owned practices. Depending on the company, there can be some issues you could encounter:

Newer doctors hired with less experience
Control over treatment provided by other orthodontists within a practice group or facility
A change mid-treatment of your chosen doctor from another office location (leading to delays.)
Changes made without consulting patient wishes about their original treatment plan

Why go Private?
Private, personal care by a doctor/owner who is invested in their patients and spends hours every day with them can ensure you receive the best possible treatment. This allows doctors to better evaluate what medicine works and how to combat diseases because they are there throughout your plan for recovery.
Private care isn’t just an assembly line that passes through revolving doors of faces without any knowledge about each patient – it’s personalized attention from someone who has known you since before you were sick.

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Conclusion
Dr. Gluck and the professionals at Gluck Orthodontics will be the ones to help with your treatment. We are completely independent. This position allows smooth and convenient treatment for you. Our Doctors have years of experience in all types of treatments and sit on professional bodies and are embedded, orthodontic community members. With us, you’ll have one expert for the entire treatment plan. No exceptions.
In order for you to get in touch with the team, you can schedule an appointment in their Tennessee office.

Keep reading this https://www.drgluck.com/where-did-my-orthodontist-go-3-easy-facts/ on Nashville Orthodontist Articles.

This post was originally published on this site